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The outside of the emergency department at Saint Peter's Hospital

Infection Control: Diarrhoea and Vomiting

All of the wards affected by D&V / Norovirus have now resolved satisfactorily and all areas are open to new admissions. This also means that restricted visiting is no longer required and normal visiting can resume.

 

Emergency Message

 

The emergency department is located at St. Peter’s Hospital.

It should only be used if you are seriously ill, or it is an emergency. Please note that there is not an A&E at Ashford Hospital. The Ashford walk-in centre is for non-urgent care only.

 

Update to Infection Prevention and Control Guidance

As we enter the winter months, there is likely to be an increase in the number of respiratory viruses, including influenza and COVID, that are circulating in the community and in the number of patients being admitted to hospital with these infections.

In line with current national guidance provided by the UK Health Security Agency, there is no longer a mandatory requirement for visitors, patients and staff entering our hospitals to wear a face mask. For those who prefer to continue to wear a mask, fluid resistant surgical masks will be readily available at our main hospital entrances. Please do help yourself. If you cannot see any then please ask a member of staff on the ward/clinic that you are attending. In our clinical areas, such as wards, where our staff are caring for patients with respiratory infections, you may see staff will wear masks, along with other personal protective equipment, as necessary. They can advise you if you have any queries.

We continuously monitor the local situation, and should we see a significant increase in the number of respiratory infections in our hospitals, then we may revise our advice, as necessary.

We ask everyone to follow these basic infection prevention and control measures in our hospitals:

  • Do not visit the hospital if you have the following symptoms:
    • New onset cough or an ongoing cough that is not improving
    • Raised temperature
    • Diarrhoea and/or vomiting
  • If you do have these symptoms and visiting is essential, and cannot be delayed for a few days whilst you recover, e.g. the patient is very unwell / dying, then please telephone the ward concerned and ask to speak to the nurse-in-charge. We are always keen to support visiting in these situations.
  • Practice good respiratory hygiene: cover your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing using a tissue or the inside of your elbow. Dispose of tissues immediately following use and clean your hands.
  • Clean your hands on entering and leaving our clinical areas, e.g. wards, using the hand wash basins or alcohol hand sanitiser available inside each patient multi-bed bay and single rooms.
  • Visitors are not routinely required to wear disposable gloves and plastic aprons; but should be worn if you are helping the patient with their personal hygiene care.

Thank you for your continued support in keeping our patients, staff and visitors safe.

David Fluck, Medical Director and Director of Infection Prevention and Control
Ellen Bull. Interim Chief Nurse
The Infection Prevention and Control Team

 

Frequently asked questions about coming to A&E

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▶   If the treatment is the same everywhere, does it matter where I go?

Yes, because you will be treated more quickly if you go to the most appropriate place. In A&E, patients with the most urgent and life-threatening conditions will always be seen first. Some services are not provided in A&E. These include repeat prescriptions, emergency dental care, blood tests, travel vaccinations, dressing changes, removal of stitches and ear syringing.

▶   Surely A&E can just ‘squeeze me in’?

Each year, nearly 100,000 patients attend A&E at St. Peter’s Hospital and we estimate that around 18,000 of these could receive more appropriate treatment elsewhere. Each extra person means our doctors and nurses have less time to treat those who really need help.

▶   If I get ill at night should I just go straight to A&E?

No, unless it’s an emergency or you are seriously unwell. A&E can be just as busy in the middle of the night so it is worth trying other services, such as your out-of-hours GP or NHS 111.

▶   When should I bring my child to A&E?

If you think your child is seriously unwell, has had a significant injury or you have been advised by your doctor. Otherwise, you should see your GP for advice and treatment. For minor infections and injuries you can attend an NHS Walk in Centre (NB: some walk-in centres will not treat children under the age of two).

 

Location

St Peter's Hospital

Map of St Peter's Hospital

 

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